Posts Tagged: Compassion

Compassion

The Refugee Journey – Open Heart, Open Hands, Open Home

– first published on January 29, 2016 Abra su Corazón, Abra sus manos y Abra su casa. “Has God been speaking to you on this refugee journey? What would it take…?” To smile at someone from another country when you meet him or her in the supermarket, at school, in your community? To say hello to a refugee you meet? (sayhelloinfo.com) To pray for refugees? To start a Jumaa Prayer Fellowship at your church to pray every Friday for Muslims? (jumaaprayer.org) To donate household items? To give food for a refugee family To listen to a refugee’s story? To learn…

The Refugee Journey – Bridging the Cultural Divide

– first published on January 28, 2016 Cerrando la Brecha Cultural Consider these cultural differences for a Muslim coming into a Christian church. In the mosque, people take their shoes off at the door. Men and women do not sit together. Women, in fact, are in a separate area secluded from the men. Muslims wash before prayer and pray in the direction of Mecca. They stand side by side; men with men and women with women, with a series of synchronized movements that include bowing, bending, and touching their heads to the floor in submission to Allah. They treat their…

The Refugee Journey – “How Do I Know That My Neighbor Is Not a Terrorist?”

– first published on January 22, 2016 “¿Cómo puedo saber si mi vecino no es un terrorista?” Obviously, not all people in the world are people of good will. Radical Muslims are convinced of their ideology and are willing to kill and die for it. The Paris attackers and the San Bernadino, CA couple prove this. Tension exists between the need for security and the desire to show compassion. This takes wisdom and discernment from the Holy Spirit. Saul of Tarsus was on the road to Damascus (Syria), breathing out murderous threats against Jesus’ disciples. Jesus spoke to Ananias to…

The Refugee Journey – Welcome or Rejection

– first published on January 21, 2016 Bienvenida o Rechazo In this time of terrorist’s attacks, gruesome ISIS videos, heated political debate, rising radical Islam and anti-Muslim rhetoric, Dale Fagerland, Director of Training for Global Initiative: Reaching Muslim Peoples describes the attitude necessary to respond to Radical Islam: “Christianity, as established by its founder and example Jesus Christ, is first and foremost a religion of love and compassion. Jesus said, “All men will know that you are my disciples if you love one another” (John 13:35). Since Muslims are our neighbors, the call from our Savior is, “Love your neighbor…

The Refugee Journey – What would it take for you to leave your country?

 – first published January 19, 2016 ¿Que haría falta para que usted dejara su País? On The Road… Most people do not like change. What would it take to pack up your family, leave your home, friends, community and everything that is familiar to set off on a dangerous journey with only the possessions you could carry in your hands? How desperate would you need to be, to pay your life savings to smugglers, hoping for a safe passage in an overcrowded, rubber boat where others before you have drowned? In the United States we have not had to ponder…

The Refugee Journey – Why am I Writing This Blog?

– first published January 18, 2016 ¿Porque estoy escribiendo este Blog? The picture of Alan Kurdi, the dead Syrian toddler, who washed ashore in Turkey, held in the arms of a Turkish policeman, sent shock waves throughout the world and opened people’s eyes to the horrors of the Syrian refugee crisis. Why am I writing this blog? Our purpose at Global Initiative is not to engage in the political debate whether or not refugees should come to the United States, but to highlight this incredible opportunity for Christians and churches to show the love of Jesus to those who arrive…

Bring literacy and the Gospel to Pakistan!

Driven from their impoverished lives in Punjab, hundreds of families live in the “Bastees” (slums), just outside of Islamabad, Pakistan. The government has declared that these shanti-towns are “illegal” and wants to shut them down completely. Some of these dwellers have been there for nearly 30 years. A majority of them are women who are illiterate but trying to provide for their uneducated children. Most of the women cannot even write their own names. A number of the dwellers are Muslim men and women, but many come from a very nominal Christian background. Several are displaced in these slums because…

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